Skip to main content

CTE and Senate Bill 155

If you are interested getting help with your college tuition and go into a career that is in high demand here in Kansas, you need to explore the Governor’s Career & Technical Education (CTE) Bill otherwise known as SB155.  SB155 was passed into law on July 1, 2012.

 

Why it Matters

The main purpose of the bill is to stimulate growth in Career & Technical Education at both the secondary and post-secondary level in Kansas. The workforce in the state of Kansas currently demands more highly-technical and highly-skilled workers and Senate Bill 155 is focused on helping high school students coming into the workforce find and secure employment in these high demand careers.

There are several parts to Senate Bill 155, those that apply specifically apply to high school students are:

  • Tuition reimbursement for high school students enrolled in college-level CTE courses,
  • Incentivizing high school students graduating with an industry-recognized certifications that lead directly to high-demand occupations in Kansas through a Certification incentive program

What you need to know about Senate Bill 155

High school students interested in exploring careers in demand, taking advantage of dual enrollments and getting tuition reimbursement enrolled in college-level CTE courses need to check with administration to take advantage of the dual enrollment or concurrently enrolled students (defined as a person, in grades 10, 11 or 12) program and meet the criteria set forth by the Kansas Board of Regents Policy. If you haven’t graduated from high school yet, you can still be officially registered as non-degree seeking student.

Each post secondary institution has different SB155 course offerings.  Check out the Kansas Virtual Technical College website or individual college websites.  The course offerings change annually.

Allen County does not currently have a SB155 web page, but offer online SB155 classes to South Haven students, contact administration for details.

Butler, Cowley, and Hutchinson  Community colleges all have web pages that provide information on their SB155 classes, many of these are available on line. See the Kansas Virtual Technical College website for more information.

CTE Student Categories

What Kind of CTE Student Will I Be?

Four statewide categories describe the level of involvement high school students have had in CTE and document the technical skill attainment they achieve.

 

A CTE participant has earned at least 0.5 credit in any state CTE course.

 

A CTE concentrator has earned at least 2.0 credits in the same state approved Pathway, and earned 70% on local technical skills measures, or passed a third-party, technical skill assessment, or earned an industry-recognized certificate. 

 

Junior and Senior students at South Haven achieve the technical skills measure by

  1. averaging their CTE letter grades for courses in the same pathway, or
  2. averaging their CTE Precision exams grades for courses in the same pathway, or
  3. by passing the general CTE assessment (cPASS) or pathway specific CTE assessments (for example: Comprehensive Agriculture). Students typically take these assessments in March/April of their Junior/Senior year or
  4. by earning an industry-recognized certificates (for example: OSHAA 10 hour, CNA, Safe Serve, or State Ag Certificate)

 

A CTE completer has earned at least 3.0 credits in the same state approved Pathway, and earned 70% on local technical skills measures, or passed a third-party, technical skill assessment, or earned an industry-recognized certificate. 

 

Junior and Senior students at South Haven achieve the technical skills measure by

  1. averaging their CTE Precision exams grades for courses in the same pathway, or
  2. by passing the general CTE assessment (cPASS) or pathway specific CTE assessments (for example: Comprehensive Agriculture). Students typically take these assessments in March/April of their Junior/Senior year or
  3. by earning an industry-recognized certificates (for example: OSHAA 10 hour, CNA, Safe Serve, or State Ag Certificate)

 

A CTE Scholar must meet seven criteria, and apply to the Kansas State Department of Education.

  1. Senior level status
  2. Have earned or presently enrolled in 3.0 or more CTE credits.
  3. Documentation of technical skill attainment
  4. CTE GPA of 3.5 or better in CTE coursework
  5. Demonstrated leadership
  6. Community Engagement
  7. Professional Learning Experiences
  8. Career Vision Summary Statement

More information about the CTE Scholar Program can be found at the KSDE Scholar Program Overview.

cte@SH2.jpg

What's This Certificate Thing?

Certifications are nationally recognized verifications of skill or knowledge attainment based on generally-accepted skill standards for an occupation. Certifications usually include a combination of an examination, demonstration of skills, and/or experience requirements.

 

The benefits of industry-recognized credentials are many: High school and postsecondary CTE programs that lead to associate degrees, certificates, and industry-recognized credentials can help young people find skilled employment and give them the option of later returning to school for a higher degree. Credentials verify skill mastery, educational attainment, and the authority to perform a task or operation—conveying real economic benefits in the labor market. Credentials are also valuable to employers, allowing them to determine the skill or education level of job applicants without having to perform an assessment for each one.

 

Each of the pathways South Haven School offers leads to an industry recognized certification or credential.